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Accenture Doctors Survey 2015: Healthcare IT pain and progress

Accenture research reveals that healthcare IT functions are on the rise across the board.

Overview

Infographic

2015 Healthcare IT Check-Up Shows Progress (And Some Pain)

The Accenture Doctors Survey 2015 shows improvement in US doctors’ adoption of electronic health records and in use of many healthcare IT functions, but some capabilities are still not part of the regimen.

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Analysis

Doctors’ routine use of all surveyed healthcare IT functions is on the rise. These functions include:

  • Communicate electronically with patients

  • Electronically notified of my patients’ interactions with other health organizations

  • Use computerized clinical decision support systems

  • Communicate electronically with clinicians in other organizations

  • Electronic referrals to/from health professionals in other organizations

  • Electronic tools to reduce the administrative burden for delivering healthcare

  • Electronic access to clinical data about a patient who has been seen by a different health organization

  • Electronically send prescriptions to pharmacies (e-Prescribing)

  • Receive electronic alerts/reminders while I am seeing my patients

  • Electronically send order requests to laboratories

  • Receive clinical results electronically that populate my patients’ EMR

  • Electronically enter patient notes either during or after consultations


VIEW THE REPORT [PDF]

Pull Out 79 Percent

Recommendations

A vast majority of US doctors (82 percent) view patient updating of personal electronic medical records as helping patient engagement. A majority says it also helps patient satisfaction (81 percent), patient understanding of health conditions (72 percent), patient/physician communication (71 percent), and accuracy of record (60 percent).

However, US doctors surveyed believe that electronic medical records have limits. Fewer US doctors see positive impact on treatment decisions, medical errors, and health outcomes than in the past. Reducing medical errors is still viewed as the main benefit.

VIEW THE REPORT [PDF]

Pull Out Decreasing Numbers

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