RESEARCH REPORT

In brief

In brief

  • Threat actors are adapting and switching their operations strategically, operationally and technically
  • Global disinformation campaigns are affecting domestic or foreign political sentiment and financial markets
  • The 2019 Cyber Threatscape Report has discovered five factors that are influencing the cyberthreat landscape
  • Organizations need to pivot their approach to security regularly to achieve cyber resilience


The 2018 Cyber Threatscape Report noted the clear need for more effective use of actionable threat intelligence. With state-sponsored activities a growing force to be reckoned with, extended supply chain threats, targets against critical infrastructure and a surge in miner malware and more financially motivated advanced persistent threats, CISOs have had their work cut out to budget and act effectively.

Despite strong investments, the relentless creativity of cybercriminals continues to put pressure on organizations to be defense ready. Cybercriminals are testing organizations’ resilience by layering attacks, updating techniques and establishing new, intricate relationships to better disguise their identities. Businesses need to re-evaluate cyber postures to include suppliers, partners and acquisition targets, alongside their own organizations, to ensure they are not opening up new security gaps or inviting in threat actors who are dormant or active on third-party networks.

Organizations must take on the disruptive forces that are changing their industries and remember their most important currency—trust.

What’s inside the 2019 Cyber Threatscape Report?

In this latest report, Accenture iDefense offers leading practices for mitigating ransomware, suggestions regarding employee cybersecurity training, evaluations of international events coming up in the next 12 months and outlines which threat actors might use such events for nefarious purposes. Accenture iDefense aims to help its clients, partners and community members by providing this information so that they can stay ahead of threats pertinent to their businesses, industries and geographies.

Disinformation and technology are evolving

As geopolitical tensions persist, cyberthreat actors use high-profile global events to influence mass opinion, taking advantage of new technologies.

Cybercriminals adapt, hustle and diversify

Financially motivated attacks are still active, but cybercriminals will continue to shift their tactics to reduce risks of detection and disruptions.

New dangers in ransomware defense and response

Ransomware attacks could pose a significant threat and may at times serve hybrid motives—financial, ideological, or political.

Supply chain threats turn friends to frenemies

Basic cybersecurity hygiene appears to be pushing cyberthreat actors to find new avenues, such as their supply chains, to compromise organizations.

Cloud vulnerabilities demand costly solutions

Modern CPU vulnerabilities pose a high risk to organizations running their compute infrastructure in the public cloud.

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A security pivot

Cybercrime is not a one-time event. Just as one avenue of income has been blocked, cybercriminals will swiftly move on to another, often more sophisticated means of entry. Organizations must adapt their approach to meet the latest demands from a rapidly changing world by remembering that:

  1. Communications targeting a global stage may not be all they seem.
  2. Cybercriminals are shifting—and so should you.
  3. The mixed motives behind ransomware are making it more destructive.
  4. This is no time for splendid isolation—your ecosystem needs you.
  5. Beware of opening more than the back door.

Organizations must learn not to dwell on the vulnerabilities of the past and be consistent but flexible in their defense. In short, they must tackle cyber resilience with a security pivot mind-set.

Mark Sayer

Accenture Security


Simon Warren

Accenture Security

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