LATEST THINKING


Operating room outsourcing services

This report explores a new business model, the Operating Room Outsourcing Services (OROS), developed to help operating manufacturers of operating room equipment and anesthesia devices address market challenges.

Overview

Today’s global operating room equipment (ORE) and anesthesia device (AD) markets are undergoing crucial structural changes. This report explores a new business model, the Operating Room Outsourcing Services (OROS), developed to help manufacturers of operating room equipment and anesthesia devices address market challenges. The core of this new concept is outsourcing services in operating rooms from hospitals and surgical centers to manufacturers. This means manufacturers will supply equipment and function in the future as the operator of an entire surgical suite.

Background
Manufacturers in the operating room equipment and anesthesia devices markets are confronting an increasing market maturity and declines in product-centric sales. They are facing challenges managing the transition to client-centric business models. Even though those changes might appear to be a big threat for today’s market leaders, numerous examples of other industries have shown that great opportunities can arise from such dynamics.

For several years technological innovation has been the key factor for success in the medical device industry. However, in times where Asian contenders are catching up and existing manufacturers face a growing mismatch between risk and reward of product innovations, technological leadership might no longer be a sufficient source of competitive advantage. Recognizing this, manufacturers constantly look for new business services that drive innovation beyond the product and offer the unique opportunity to differentiate from competitors.

Analysis

Accenture expects the operating room equipment and anesthesia devices market to continue to grow in the near future, but likely with a shift in growth to emerging markets and new forms of business. Developed countries will remain an important part of the mix, however.

Product-centric sales are likely to decline, coupled with an increase in client centric sales. Manufacturers will need to carefully manage this transition in order to keep revenue streams high. Further, operating rooms of the future will likely evolve into outsourcing models characterized by actively managed capacity utilization and maximum operational efficiency. This evolution will lead to operating rooms managed by manufacturers that will generate numerous benefits for all involved stakeholders.

Recommendations

To successfully broaden a manufacturer’s value chain, it is recommended to get experienced partners on board. Four competencies will be key in bringing the OROS concept to fruition: Technological, Medical, Development & Implementation and Scaling. Manufacturers should join forces with experienced business partners to make the business idea as big as possible in as short a time as possible.

A network of powerful partnerships between equipment manufacturers, surgical institutions and Operating Room Outsourcing Services providers will lay the foundation for a client-centric business model that has the potential to bring about more profitable, more efficient and more sustainable changes in surgical procedures.