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Cloud first, five years later
Cloud first, five years later
Cloud first, five years later

In 2011, the White House formally committed to a Cloud First strategy, citing the potential for mass cost savings and improved agility as key drivers. Cybersecurity was another emerging priority as threats to legacy systems evolved.
In 2011, the White House formally committed to a Cloud First strategy, citing the potential for mass cost savings and improved agility as key drivers. Cybersecurity was another emerging priority as threats to legacy systems evolved.
In 2011, the White House formally committed to a Cloud First strategy, citing the potential for mass cost savings and improved agility as key drivers. Cybersecurity was another emerging priority as threats to legacy systems evolved.
However, according to a 2016 flash poll by Government Business Council, federal employees now feel true cloud readiness also means addressing technical and business case requirements which are integral to the migration.
However, according to a 2016 flash poll by Government Business Council, federal employees now feel true cloud readiness also means addressing technical and business case requirements which are integral to the migration.
However, according to a 2016 flash poll by Government Business Council, federal employees now feel true cloud readiness also means addressing technical and business case requirements which are integral to the migration.

ARE FEDERAL AGENCIES

CLOUD READY?

ARE FEDERAL AGENCIES

CLOUD READY?

ARE FEDERAL AGENCIES

CLOUD READY?

Agencies are making progress in terms of their enterprise ability to support cloud computing. We looked at three key criteria to gauge readiness and level of progress toward a Cloud First approach.





THREE KEY CRITERIA


Agencies are making progress in terms of their enterprise ability to support cloud computing. We looked at three key criteria to gauge readiness and level of progress toward a Cloud First approach.





THREE KEY CRITERIA


Agencies are making progress in terms of their enterprise ability to support cloud computing. We looked at three key criteria to gauge readiness and level of progress toward a Cloud First approach.

THREE KEY CRITERIA

HAS YOUR
AGENCY…




Established business case
and cost requirements for moving to the cloud?




Addressed the security
requirements
associated with cloud computing?




Acquired the technical capabilities—skills, processes, and tools—to effectively manage cloud environments?





HAS YOUR
AGENCY…




Established business case
and cost requirements for moving to the cloud?




Addressed the security
requirements
associated with cloud computing?




Acquired the technical capabilities
skills, processes, and tools—to effectively manage cloud environments?





HAS YOUR
AGENCY…




Established business case
and cost requirements for moving to the cloud?

MINIMALLY

35%

PARTIALLY

42%

FULLY

23%




Addressed the security
requirements
associated with cloud computing?

MINIMALLY

32%

PARTIALLY

41%

FULLY

27%



Acquired the technical capabilities
skills, processes, and tools—to effectively manage cloud environments?


MINIMALLY

30%

PARTIALLY

40%

FULLY

30%





MINIMALLY





35%








32%







30%







MINIMALLY





35%








32%







30%







MINIMALLY







35%












32%












30%










PARTIALLY





42%








41%







40%







PARTIALLY





42%








41%







40%







PARTIALLY







42%












41%












40%









FULLY





23%








27%







30%







PARTIALLY





23%








27%







40%







FULLY







23%












27%












30%








WHAT AGENCIES CAN DO NOW

WHAT AGENCIES CAN DO NOW

WHAT AGENCIES CAN DO NOW

About a third of federal agencies are only minimally addressing these three key
criteria. Here's how your agency can more fully embrace cloud readiness—in action
and approach.




ESTABLISHING
A CASE:

THE CLOUD ISN’T JUST A
SECURITY TRANSITION.

IT’S A STRUCTURAL
TRANSFORMATION.


Agencies should prioritize business,
technical, and organizational policies that take full advantage of the cloud.





ADDRESSING
SECURITY REQUIREMENTS:

SEEK THE AID OF ADVANCED
CLOUD PRACTITIONERS

BOTH IN AND OUT OF
GOVERNMENT.


By seeking out industry expertise, agencies can more rapidly deploy proven solutions that meet their fundamental requirements.





ACQUIRING TECHNICAL
CAPABILITIES:

APPROACH TRANSFORMATION
CONFIDENTLY.


Agencies can be more confident
in their cloud journey by
specifying
performance metrics in service level
agreements (SLAs), and by ensuring
communication and accountability ever
step of the way.