Device-as-a-Service (DaaS) business models have been rapidly growing since first introduced. The pandemic of course has accelerated this trend as more employees work from home and no longer have the luxury of getting in-person support from IT around their devices and equipment.

According to a survey Accenture conducted in 2015, no major PC manufacturers offered a DaaS option for hardware acquisitions. Today, that has changed, in 2019 65% of major PC makers were offering DaaS options to their customers. Gartner also predicts as part of its global public cloud services market forecast that the DaaS sector will experience the most growth in 2020, with spending expected to increase by 95% year over year to $1.2bn.

<<< Start >>>

“The benefit is that by keeping control of the devices and surrounding them with different kinds of services and capabilities each time you can give more to customers. That's why we think this is an exciting trend.”
- KEVIN DOBBS

<<< End >>>

I was recently interviewed by Tech Republic about the benefits and challenges of DaaS. Boosting revenues and margins are among the many benefits. Instead of a company selling a hardware product one time, they can now sell it up to five times, repackaging products with new services and capabilities when delivered to the next customers. However, the supply chain challenges can be quite complex for vendors as they have to manage the collection, refurbishing and redistribution of these technology offerings. You can read more about these supply chain impacts in an article I recently authored.

What makes DaaS successful?

Everyone is getting used to consumption-based models in their everyday lives and it comes with higher expectations in terms of the customer and user experience. No one really cares about the device itself: they want an easy, pain-free service experience that meets their needs, which DaaS can deliver.

How can companies ensure they can provide a successful, scalable DaaS offering?

There are four main principles to follow as outlined in our recent DaaS Point of View:

<<< Start >>>

1. Customer experience

Customer experience is crucial. Designing from the outside-in enables continual success throughout the customer lifecycle and a unified experience for every interaction.

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

2. Asset lifecycle management

Set up the scope and automation from the outset to help sustain scalability.

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

3. Flexibility

Be ready to adapt quickly as products and services are configured for specific use cases that will drive innovation over time.

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

4. Platform integration

Connect operations within the company and supply chain to provide continual visibility to all assets and able to deliver a proactive and pleasurable customer experience.

<<< End >>>

DaaS has demonstrated the power of Everything-as-a-Service (XaaS) offerings to transformation businesses. There are many XaaS models that are being designed, considered and implemented across many industries. The growing success of DaaS should motivate organizations to evaluate how they can take advantage of these resilient and scalable models, especially in the current COVID environment.

Kevin Dobbs

Managing Director – Accenture Consulting


Vikrant Viniak

Managing Director –​ Accenture Strategy

Subscription Center
Subscribe to High Tech Perspectives Blog Subscribe to High Tech Perspectives Blog