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September 15, 2017
Impressions from Jenkins World 2017
By: Keith Pleas

Jenkins World 2017 once again lived up to its billing as a global DevOps event, highlighting the symbiotic partnership between a vibrant open source community and a dedicated corporate sponsor.

Nearly 1,800 attendees from 50 countries (including 49 U.S. states) gathered in San Francisco August 28-31 for this year’s event, produced by CloudBees. Attendees absorbed wisdom from 124 speakers across 92 breakout sessions.

One of my personal highlights was an address by Kohsuke Kawaguchi, creator of the Jenkins project and CloudBees’s Chief Technology Officer.

Impressions Jenkins World

Accenture was fortunate to be selected to participate in both a Community track with Delivering Alexa Skills with Jenkins by Robbie Glenn and Pavol Szorad (discussed two weeks ago), and a CloudBees discussion with Achieving Mass Sharing and Reuse with Jenkins by James Gress (videos from these and other the sessions will be posted next week on the conference site).

Days of #DevOps peace, love & understanding at #JenkinsWorld 2017 – Accenture’s Keith Pleas blogs:

 
 

Accenture’s Stas Zvinyatskovsky—who in a previous life ran the world’s largest Jenkins installation—was invited to join CloudBees CEO Sacha Labourey’s opening-day keynote, in which Stas highlighted Accenture’s use of CloudBees Jenkins to support 25,000 unique users across 200 Jenkins masters.

Stas Zvinyatskovsky

One of the proudest moments for me was when Accenture received the DevOps Scalability Achievement Award from Sacha for our work with a leading technology firm in North America. In this project, our client cut production deployment time by more than 90 percent, decreased environment set-up time by 96 percent and entirely eliminated downtime for deployments (read more in this case study).

DevOps Scalability Achievement Award

One of the more piquant moments was Jez Humble’s industry keynote on DevOps Transformation, in which he chose not to define DevOps because, as he put it, “it’s constantly evolving.” Then, he displayed a slide stating that DevOps is about “culture and architecture, not process, tools and organizational structure.”

Many conversations and presentations in our industry begin with “what is DevOps?” I’d therefore may have added this definition to the half-dozen I routinely use:

Way Build Software

My personal definition centers on culture, but as I wrote here in March, it could just as easily be centered on values.

Yet, with that lack of agreement around a common definition of DevOps, there were still nearly 2,000 people vigorously discussing the best ways—and tools—for solving software delivery problems.

What were the patterns observed?

Seven breakout sessions focused on containers and the Jenkins Pipeline, with the Docker workshop sold out.

On the flip-side, sponsors had much more to say than the speakers about security—roughly a third of the sponsors listed security as a focus, while only three of the breakout sessions covered security. Only six sessions called out testing or quality, which suggests a historical enterprise focus on specialized roles, rather than a cross-functional view emphasized by cloud-native teams.

Still, any concerns about where the industry might be going in the future melted away when attendees put on their “peace” signs and rose-colored glasses for the “Summer of Love” evening party:

Jenkins World 2018

Jenkins World 2018 is scheduled for September 16-19 in San Francisco. It’s already on my calendar – how about yours?

photos courtesy CloudBees Jenkins World 2017

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