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Singapore research recap: Accenture consumer survey on patient engagement

Accenture survey assesses the public’s attitudes toward their medical providers’ electronic capabilities, as well as the capabilities of their current providers.

Overview

The Accenture Consumer Survey on Patient Engagement revealed several interesting findings:

  • Between 41 percent and 51 percent of consumers in Singapore say that their medical providers’ electronic capabilities are somewhat important. Another 21 percent to 45 percent say these capabilities are very important. Booking appointments online (88 percent) and receiving electronic reminders (87 percent) are somewhat or very important to nearly nine out of 10 consumers, followed closely by accessing electronic medical records online (86 percent).

    Requesting prescription refills is important to fewer consumers (72 percent), although the majority still say this capability is important. See the infographic.

  • About one-third of consumers in Singapore (29 percent to 36 percent) say they currently track each of the surveyed aspects of their health. Health indicators like weight and blood pressure are the most commonly tracked (36 percent), followed by physical activity or diet (34 percent).

    Fewer consumers track symptoms (29 percent). See the chart.

  • Consumers’ access to electronic services with their current providers varies by capability from 17 percent to 58 percent. The majority of consumers can book appointments online (55 percent) and receive electronic reminders (58 percent). These two services are also of top importance to consumers (88 percent and 87 percent respectively).

    Fewer can request prescription refills (17 percent), email with providers (22 percent) and access electronic medical records online (31 percent). See the graphic.

Background

On behalf of Accenture, Harris Interactive conducted an online survey of 9,015 adults (18 years of age and older) across nine countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, England, France, Germany, Singapore, Spain and the United States.

The survey assessed the general public’s attitudes toward their medical providers’ electronic capabilities, as well as the capabilities of their current providers. Where relevant, the survey uses select findings from the Accenture Doctors Survey to compare the doctor and consumer responses. The research was conducted between July 25 and 31, 2013.

Analysis
Electronic capabilities are important to most consumers (72 percent to 88 percent) in Singapore. A majority of consumers (88 percent) say that booking appointments online is at least somewhat important. Requesting prescription refills, while important to almost three-quarters (72 percent) of consumers, is the least important of the capabilities surveyed. See the infographic.

About one-third of consumers in Singapore track each of the surveyed aspects of their health, with health indicators such as weight and blood pressure most commonly tracked (36 percent). Slightly more than a third (37 percent) of consumers do not actively track any of the surveyed health information. See the chart.

The majority of consumers without online access to electronic medical records (61 percent) say they would consider switching providers to gain access. Male consumers (70 percent) are more likely to say they would switch than female consumers (52 percent). Consumers who say it is important to have online access to electronic medical records are more likely to switch (64 percent) than those who say online access is not important (43 percent).

Recommendations

Between about one-third (29 percent) and about one-half (58 percent) of doctors say that electronic capabilities are available to their patients. Between about one in five (17 percent) and about one-half (58 percent) of consumers say these same capabilities are available with their current providers. See how other capabilities rank in this chart.

Consumers who consider it important (very/somewhat) to have electronic access to their medical records are more likely to switch providers to gain access (64 percent) compared to those consumers who do not find it to be important (at all/very) (43 percent).

Nearly all consumers (96 percent) say they should have at least some access to their electronic health records (EHRs), while 70 percent actually have any level of access. Most consumers (73 percent) prefer full access, while most doctors (63 percent) say patients should have limited access.

For more information, contact:

Corissa Leung

Health Industry Lead, ASEAN