• Emerging technologies can transform our ability to address seemingly intractable societal challenges.
  • By collaborating to accelerate the adoption of proven new technologies, Dutch businesses and policymakers could more than triple their value-creating potential.
  • We show how tech-enabled solutions can reduce the social costs of traffic congestion, dementia care, and food waste, unlocking up to €3.5 billion of new value annually.

<<< Start >>>

<<< End >>>

In our recent survey 'Inclusive technology. How inclusive technology can tackle social problems in the Netherlands', we discuss how the accelerated adoption of new technologies can offer great cost reductions in the Netherlands. Strikingly, great cost reductions can already be achieved by accelerating three technologies used to tackle issues in mobility, healthcare, and the food industry. 

<<< Start >>>

Full Report: Inclusive technology in the Netherlands

Scaling AI and other exponential technologies more aggressively could improve care for dementia, as well as sharply reduce traffic congestion and food waste. The benefits for Dutch society would be vast—up to €3.5 billion annually by 2030. To unlock this value, business leaders and policymakers should create stronger cooperative ecosystems and adopt a ‘Total Value Canvas’ perspective to guide their decision-making.

download the full report Here

<<< End >>>

A €15 billion challenge

From AI to nanotech, new technologies promise to help tackle the societal challenges that diminish our wellbeing, stymie social justice, and hinder environmental sustainability. They could also drive significant new market growth opportunities.

The Dutch government has called on businesses, academia, and innovators to work together in pursuing 25 missions for strengthening the economy through societal impact in areas including the energy transition, agriculture, nutrition, health, and security. We modeled three challenges—traffic congestion, dementia care, and food waste—that together cost Dutch society €15 billion.

<<< Start >>>

From AI to nanotech, new technologies promise to help tackle societal challenges. We modeled three challenges—traffic congestion, dementia care, and food waste—that together cost Dutch society €15 billion.

<<< End >>>

We assessed the technologies that are helping to address these challenges:

  • Intelligent traffic signals.
  • Lifestyle monitoring systems for dementia patients.
  • Smart food-management technologies that help us waste less food.

Our Total Value Canvas model accounts for costs and benefits experienced by diverse stakeholders that traditional economic measurements like GDP often overlook. We estimated that these technologies will unlock €1.0 billion of trapped value for Dutch society by 2030, through reduced time lost in traffic, better care and increased independence for dementia patients, and a lower volume of food wasted by households and restaurants.  

<<< Start >>>

€1.0B

Dutch society can save €1.0 billion annually by 2030 if we keep the current adoption pace of intelligent traffic signals, lifestyle monitoring systems for dementia patients, and smart food management technologies that help us waste less food. 

€3.5B

Dutch society can save up to €3.5 billion annually by 2030 if we accelerate the adoption of intelligent traffic signals, lifestyle monitoring systems for dementia patients, and smart food management technologies that help us waste less food. 

<<< End >>>

Accelerating adoption creates €3.5 billion of value

These estimates, however, are based on assumptions that we feel are too conservative. For example, they assume that predictive traffic model software will continue to be present in just 50 percent of intelligent traffic lights, that lifestyle monitoring technologies reach only 5 percent of people newly diagnosed with dementia, and that only 36 percent of restaurants deploy food monitoring.

So, we asked what could happen if their adoption were accelerated. We estimate that up to €2.0 billion of additional value would flow on top of a baseline €1.0 billion of new value brought about by current rates of adoption.

In human terms, the high adoption scenario would mean, each year, 26 million hours less time lost in traffic, 3,000 additional dementia patients living independently at home for longer, and 318k tonnes less CO2 emitted due to food-waste reductions.

The high adoption of new technologies would, each year, mean:

<<< Start >>>

26M 

26 million hours less time lost in traffic each year.

3,000 

3,000 additional dementia patients living independently at home for longer.

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

318k tonnes

318k tonnes less CO2 emitted due to food-waste reductions.

<<< End >>>

Four steps to get started

There is no simple guide for scaling complex technologies efficiently and inclusively. But an ecosystem approach that fosters collaboration between diverse public and private stakeholders can help lay the foundation for success. We have found that organizations embrace a collaborative ecosystem approach start with four steps:

  1. Create new measures of success. Effective ecosystem collaboration often requires a shift in focus from effort to outcome. This needs to be grounded in new shared measures of success.
  2. Adopt incentives for pioneering and adaptation. Successful ecosystem collaboration creates incentives that enable all parties to share in the overall benefits. New technologies can create significant value for individuals and society, but there are often stakeholder groups that lose out in the short term. Some actors in the ecosystem will need to adapt to the effects of the technologies; others will need to invest to help accommodate this adaption.
  3. Encourage responsible data-sharing. Data plays a critical role in accelerating the deployment of technology. Successful ecosystems work towards harmonized data formats and protocols, arrangements for fair sharing of value between small and large companies, as well as safeguards for privacy and security.
  4. Embrace purpose-driven leadership. Successful ecosystems often start with organizational leaders taking ownership of the broader challenge. This can mean accepting responsibilities that go beyond the activities for which they are directly accountable in the value chain, in recognition of the longer-term benefits and positive spillovers. And it can require accepting the fact that some activities become a joint responsibility, potentially managed at a consortium level.

<<< Start >>>

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

The New Insiders - Episode 5 - Inclusive technology

In episode 5 of The New Insiders series, we will inspire you on how emerging technologies can transform our ability to address seemingly intractable societal challenges. In the opening talk, Irine Gaasbeek will talk to DSM's Marcus Remmers about the subject. Afterward, you can three deep-dive sessions about the topics discussed in this report: traffic congestion, dementia care, and food waste. Register now for this online event on Thursday, January 21 at 13.00!

<<< End >>>

<<< Start >>>

<<< End >>>

Don't forget to download the full report, which you can find at the top of the article. Do you have any questions about the outcomes of the report? Or would you like to know more about adopting inclusive technology? Feel free to reach out to Irine Gaasbeek or Sytze Dijkstra.

Eager to find out more about our responsible business research, partnerships, or activities? Check out our other responsible business stories.

Irine Gaasbeek

Country Managing Director – Accenture the Netherlands


Sytze Dijkstra

Senior Principal – Accenture Research

Subscription Center
Subscribe to Accenture Insights Subscribe to Accenture Insights