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CAREERS


ACCENTURE TECH TALK SERIES
AT HKUST

ACCENTURE TECH TALK 1: TECHNOLOGY VISION

Accenture, in cooperation with the faculties of two HKUST engineering departments - Computer Science and Engineering (CSE), and Electronic and Computer Engineering (ECE), delivered a technology seminar around global technology trends to nearly 200 students in the evening of September 21.

Malcolm Hsiao, Managing Director of Technology Strategy - Accenture Strategy in Greater China shared the five trends identified by Accenture Technology Vision 2016: Intelligent automation, liquid workforces, the platform economy, predictable disruption and digital trust.

This seminar is the first of the Accenture Tech Talk series jointly organized with HKUST Engineering and Computer Science Departments. We welcome everyone in HKUST to join this seminar. The second seminar will take place on November 23.

Ms Cindy Li from Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Malcolm Hsiao from Accenture, Mr Albert Wong from Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering with attending students
Full house of audience at the lecture hall
“People First” is the theme of Accenture Technology Vision 2016

Accenture Tech Vision Research Methodology

Every year, the Technology Vision team partners with Accenture Research to pinpoint the emerging IT developments that will have the greatest impact on companies, government agencies, and other organizations in the next three to five years. The research process began during 2015 with gathering inputs from the Technology Vision External Advisory Board, a group comprising more than two dozen experienced individuals from the public and private sectors, academia, venture capital, and entrepreneurial companies. In addition, the Technology Vision team conducted interviews with technology luminaries and industry experts, as well as with nearly 100 Accenture business leaders.

Accenture Tech Talk 2: Technologists’ Future

Accenture Digital Technology Strategists

On November 23, 2016, Accenture digital technology strategists - Patrick, Beatrice, Koray and Teresa (front row from left 3) - jointly gave a multi-dimensional, thought provoking and future looking session to 100 STEM students from Computer Science and Engineering departments on how to plan their career.

The 45-minute talk can be summarized in 6 Q&As.

  1. ‘Will technology replace people making our career prospects more miserable?’

  2. ‘The world is changing so fast. What jobs will become obsolete, what jobs will be evolved in the near future? How will the future workforce look like?’

  3. ‘How to keep myself competitive in the job market?’

  4. ‘What industries have the biggest demand in analytics and big data professionals?’

  5. ‘I have a technology background. How should I equip myself to become a business technology consultant? Should I be involved in more R&D?’

  6. ‘How’s life as an Accenture consultant? How to prepare for the interview with Accenture?’


Q1: ‘Will technology replace people making our career prospects more miserable?’
A1: “Digital is disrupting anything including the existing work and workforce”, Koray kicked off the session with Gartner’s 2016 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies. But we don’t see technologies will reduce headcounts, rather, they create new types of job including the new division of work between human and machines. An Accenture study conducted with more than 500 leading banks and insurers stated, 84% respondents agree that firms will need to focus on training their machines as much as their people in three years time. This is great news to the STEM students who are well grounded with technology skills. What we need to do is to pay attention to the evolving technology trends in digital disruption.

Digital is disrupting existing work and workforces... and creating the need for new jobs and functions
72% believe that the new workforce will consist of employees as well as intelligent machines
Q2: ‘The world is changing so fast. What jobs will become obsolete, what jobs will be evolved in the near future? How will the future workforce look like?’
A2: “Honestly, many of the existing jobs did not exist when I graduated more than 10 years ago.” , Patrick shared his personal experience. Back in his school time, many of the jobs he looked for no longer exist now. He suggested the floor to do more thinking around “Business Value through Technology Innovation” and “Technology Enabled Customer Experience and Value”. What the business would need in the future, and further down - what will their customers need in future, what will be the consumer behavior in future, aligning technology evolvement to business and people needs. Patrick encouraged the audience to have more exchanges with business students and participate in case competitions to strengthen this part of thinking where STEM students may usually put less focus on.

Q3: ‘How to keep myself competitive in the job market?’
A3:

The world looks uncertain but there are everlasting mindsets, skills and personal qualities that can help us win through all changes to shape our own future.

Beatrice cited the current drivers of change in the workforce. All down to data skills, people skills and the most important of all is being ADAPTIVE.

As speed of innovation continues to accelerate, one must adapt quickly in order to excel
Patrick, as a computer science graduate, supplemented that, other than ‘thinking’, storytelling skills is vital in the work field. Shape your ideas into a simple and intriguing story to attract and impress your audience. Most bosses or clients can only squeeze 5 minutes or even less to listen to our thoughts. Patrick encouraged students to grasp any presentation opportunities at school when we’re allowed to fail and learn.

Q4: ‘What industries have the biggest demand in analytics and big data professionals?’
A4:

Koray shared that predictive analytics is certainly prevalent in the Health industry. Banking, ecommerce and industrial IoT also put a lot of weight on analytics and big data.


Q5: ‘I have a technology background. How should I equip myself to become a business technology consultant? Should I be involved in more R&D?’
A5:

Koray worked in R&D before. R&D certainly plays an important role in developing business insights, but strategy and consulting are another profession where we generate insights through our practical experience in industries and our understanding about the marketplace enabled by our global network knowledge sharing and research. Then we put things into a framework through our proven methodologies to help our clients shape the future and transform their businesses. Accenture is not just thinking but also doing. We work at the intersection of business and technology.


Q6: ‘How’s life as an Accenture consultant? How to prepare for the interview with Accenture?’
A6:

There isn’t a typical day in Accenture, replied by Teresa. New projects come along anytime. You will never get bored, no worries about lack of challenges.

We often follow proven sets of methodologies. Then we’ll go through a series of fact-based whiteboard discussions supported by data analysis and research. Finally, we structure the thoughts and ideas into a story which is typically consisted of three parts: 1) existing challenges for our client, 2) identify objectives for the project, 3) action plan.

Communication skills are essential to interviews.

More….
If you want to know more about how Accenture applies new and emerging technologies for companies in different industries at the speed of now, or client cases and trends about business applications of technologies in various industries, please visit www.accenture.com
To learn more about career opportunities at Accenture, please visit www.careers.accenture.com
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