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Sparking passion in your people

Attract and retain the best of a new generation for German companies

Overview

In the past, German employers have successfully attracted a talented and loyal workforce through apprenticeships and internships. But according to the Accenture Strategy 2016 German University Graduates Study, that may not be enough to produce a high-performing workforce of the future.

More so than in other countries, university graduates in Germany are highly pragmatic in their career choices and committed to their employer. Yet, it appears that many graduates may feel at risk of becoming lost within the inflexible work experiences and more rigid career paths of a larger organization.

That means igniting the passion needed for experienced workers to take their performance to the next level. Organizations must provide employee experiences that will make today’s graduates want to stay and grow with them.

DOWNLOAD SPARKING PASSION IN YOUR PEOPLE: HOW TO ATTRACT AND RETAIN THE BEST OF A NEW GENERATION [PDF]

Country Findings

Learn about how graduates prepare for the workforce in your country

0%
0%
Choose area of study out of a passion
0%
0%
Completed an apprenticeship or internship
0%
0%
Expect to stay at first employer for 3+ years
0%
0%
Employed in field of study
0%
0%
Feel underemployed
0%
0%
Prefer to work for a large company

Choose area of study out of a passion

Completed an apprenticeship or internship

Expect to stay at first employer for 3+ years

Employed in field of study

Feel underemployed

Prefer to work for a large company

Key Findings


According to our study, a high degree of pragmatism runs through German university programs and, therefore, into students’ initial forays into the workforce. For example, a significant majority of graduates—82 percent—looked primarily at job availability when choosing their area of university study.

Tracking from a field of study to an internship to a job is also commonplace among our survey participants. For example, 93 percent of new graduates completed an apprenticeship or internship either before or during university studies, compared to 68 percent and 69 percent, respectively, in our US and UK studies.

The work experience of recent graduates in Germany is not necessarily rosy, however. In fact, 59 percent consider themselves underemployed—working in a job that does not actually require their degree.

Class of 2016

The Accenture Strategy 2016 German University Graduate Employment Study highlights the disparity between new graduate expectations and the reality of the working world.

Recommendations

How can organizations use these insights to attract and retain high performers among entry-level employees? Here are a few important actions to take.

Hyper-personalize your talent strategy. Tailor and implement a comprehensive talent strategy centered on a personalized approach.

Transform your internship programs into a talent magnet. Maintain momentum from your internships into full-time employment. Make a personal connection and don’t let go.

Bridge the gap. Leverage digital natives and their experiences for the benefit of your organization. Help newer hires understand how their skills contribute to overall business performance.

Provide a small-team feel. Offer opportunities to work on smaller projects and give newer employees specific accountabilities in line with their interests and strengths.

Re-connect learning with performance. Emphasize on-the-job learning and help employees see the connection between their skills and ongoing career opportunities.

Drive passion and purpose: Connect employees’ talents and interests to the purpose of the organization and offer them choices rather than top-down decrees.

LEARN MORE ABOUT ACCENTURE STRATEGY


Authors


Tim Good

Managing Director – Accenture Strategy, Talent & Organization, Austria, Switzerland and Germany Lead

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Rouven Fuchs

Managing Director – Accenture Strategy, Talent & Organization


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