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INSPIRATION


Innovate unafraid of taking risks

Josie Peressinoto Romero, Natura Vice-president of Operations and Logistics

Member of Natura team since 2010, executive Josie Peressinoto Romero explains that making mistakes, acknowledging them, and correcting them are key to having innovative mind and creating new opportunities. You have to learn from adversity and you should not make the same mistakes again.

In the beginning of your professional life, did you ever think you would pursue an executive career? What has awakened you to follow this new path?

I truly became interested in an executive career in my junior year of college, when I began taking internships and could see what it really felt like working in a large company, learning constantly, and being challenged.

Planning is an integral part of your profession. Does your personal life also include planning? Or chance has played an important role on it?

The truth is I’m very disciplined and obstinate. Planning is important, but I also follow my heart and intuition. Surprises happen and you have to be aware not to miss out on any opportunity to learn and be happy. I believe nothing happens by chance and you may even not know it, but you build your own way with every step and attitude you take and, mostly, by interacting with the people that you come across in life.

A minor fault can have a far-reaching consequence in a distribution chain. How do you handle your mistakes?

I really don’t like making mistakes, but we grow and learn to make the best of each situation. Today, I understand that mistakes are part of the learning process—when you innovate and challenge the status quo—and that quickly acknowledging and correcting them is what matters most. To do it differently, to create new things, you can’t be afraid of your mistakes. It doesn’t mean you can have everything at stake all the time, but that you should stimulate innovation. The important thing is not making the same mistake again. I usually joke around with my team and say that we only have a quota for new mistakes—not old ones, please. When we talk about service and product quality, for example, we should see every complaint sent to our customer center as an opportunity to make the customer loyal.

"Today, I understand that mistakes are part of the learning process—when you innovate and challenge the status quo—and that quickly acknowledging and correcting them is what matters most. To do it differently, to create new things, you can’t be afraid of your mistakes."