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Building digital trust
with Australian
healthcare consumers

EXPLORING CONSUMERS' DIGITAL TRUST

Most Australian consumers (89 percent) believe the security of their digital healthcare data is important, yet according to an Accenture survey, 16 percent have experienced a breach of their healthcare data. While many Australians trust their general practitioners, pharmacists, specialists, nurses and pathology labs to keep their digital healthcare data secure—that trust is at times misplaced and once gone, is almost impossible to restore. In response, more than a quarter of consumers who experienced a breach switched to another healthcare provider.

To better understand consumer attitudes toward healthcare data, ethics, digital trust, roles and responsibilities, data sharing and breaches, Accenture conducted a survey across seven countries.

See the full results for Australia.

LACK OF UNDERSTANDING

Australia ranked lowest in terms of level of healthcare data security understanding, compared with the seven other countries surveyed. In fact, only 8 percent said they know “a lot” about data security in healthcare. Only 42 percent of Australians understand digital healthcare data security.

Although Australia is a predominantly tech-savvy country with high use of smartphones, digital payments, online shopping and other digital technologies, there is a general lack of digital healthcare data literacy. While these figures are disappointing, they provide a mandate for data custodians to provide a higher level of transparency and education to consumers on the security of their health records.

Explore the research findings to see how Australia stacks up against other countries.


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BREACHES ARE HAPPENING

Not surprisingly, given that 58 percent of Australians don’t know much about healthcare data security, one in six Australian consumers has experienced a breach of their healthcare data. The stolen data was used by thieves for a variety of purposes ranging from fraudulently filling prescriptions (46 percent) to purchasing items (21 percent). The consumers’ identities were used fraudulently in 93 percent of the breach instances.

In response to the breach of their healthcare data, a third of Australian consumers changed their healthcare provider. While changing their medical provider is the action most often taken, others (26 percent) changed passwords or other credentials, added security software to their personal computer (24 percent) and sought legal help (23 percent).

Find out more about where breaches occur when you read the full findings.

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STEPS TO BUILD DIGITAL TRUST

Five million Australians have an electronic health record—and that number will only increase. As more records go online, more Australians will also be at risk of a data breach. International experience has taught us that some breaches are virtually inevitable. However, government entities and private healthcare providers can do more to ensure that information is protected securely.

Australia’s success at protecting the privacy and security of digital health information will be determined by how well prepared we are to respond to the threats, and how firmly committed we are to establish digital trust with Australian consumers.

See recommended actions and a full cybersecurity checklist in the POV.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Ian Manovel
Ian Manovel
Principal Director – Healthcare
Accenture Australia


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